Accession Number:

ADA409742

Title:

Influence of Bone Remodeling Inhibition on the Development of Experimental Stress Fractures

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 1 Sep 2001-31 Aug 2002

Corporate Author:

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIV DETROIT MI

Report Date:

2002-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

Stress fractures result from repetitive loading and have been regarded as a mechanical fatigue-driven process. However, a number of studies indicate that increased remodeling precedes the occurrence of bone microdamage and stress fractures, suggesting a central role for bone remodeling in the pathogenesis of stress fractures. Our ongoing experiments test the hypothesis by pharmacological inhibition of bone remodeling will slow the subsequent accumulation of microdamage, diminishing the severity of the stress fracture. We are using a bisphosphonate BIS in the rabbit tibial stress fracture model, to test the hypothesis that reactive remodeling within the cortex drives the development of stress fractures. Results to date indicate that BIS antiresorptive therapy reduces the intensity of the stress fracture response, as indicated by 99mTechneitum bone scans, with the uptake of 99mTechneitum reduced by approximately 50 percent in treated animals as compared to saline-treated controls. However, BIS treatment attenuated, but did not completely prevent the stress fracture response. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that bone remodeling contributes to the pathogenesis of stress fracture. The implication of this suppression on the later accumulation of bone microcracks and the evolution of final stress fracture are unknown are currently under investigation.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE