Accession Number:

ADA409505

Title:

Engineering Devices to Treat Epilepsy: A Clinical Perspective

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

PENNSYLVANIA UNIV PHILADELPHIA DEPT OFBIOENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2001-10-25

Pagination or Media Count:

6.0

Abstract:

25 OF THE WORLDS 50 MILLION PEOPLE WITH EPILEPSY HAVE SEIZURES THAT CANNOT BE CONTROLLED BY MEDICATION OR EPILEPSY SURGERY. The need for new therapeutic options is clear. Since the 1970s clinicians, neuroscientists and engineers have proposed technologies for treating seizures, with the ultimate goal of implanting stimulators or drug infusion devices in brain to abort seizures before clinical onset. Interest in the field has exploded in recent years, due to evidence suggesting that seizures may be predictable. Device designs range from blind stimulators, which do not respond to physiological activity, to intelligent devices, which are triggered by detecting or predicting seizure onset. To gain acceptance, intracranial implants will need to demonstrate more than marginal efficacy to justify their invasiveness. Unlike their cardiology predecessors, intelligent implantable epilepsy devices will likely process multiple channels of data, be tuned to individual patients and may need to predict events rather than detect them, for maximal effectiveness. Carefully designed clinical trials will be required to perfect and validate the efficacy of implantable devices for epilepsy, before clinical use becomes widespread.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE