Accession Number:

ADA409426

Title:

Bone Geometry as a Predictor of Tissue Fragility and Stress Fracture Risk

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 10 Sep 2001-10 Sep 2002

Corporate Author:

MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MEDICINE NEW YORK

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2002-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

11.0

Abstract:

Having a narrow tibia relative to body mass has been shown to be a major predictor of stress fracture risk and fragility. The reason for this phenomenon is not understood. Based on studies of genetically distinct inbred mouse strains, we found a reciprocal relationship between bone mass and bone quality, such that slender bones are associated with more damageable bone tissue. We postulate that a similar reciprocal relationship between bone mass and bone material properties exists in the human skeleton. The intriguing possibility that slender bones, like those we have demonstrated in animal models, may be composed of more damageable material than larger bones has not been considered. To test this hypothesis, we propose to determine whether whole bone geometry is a predictor of tissue fragility in the tibia from young male donors. Tissue damageability will be assessed from biomechanical testing of compact bone samples and correlated with measures of bone slenderness. Specimens will be subjected to detailed analyses of bone microstructure, composition, and microdamage content. In the second set of experiments, these analyses will be repeated for female donors to test for gender differences in tissue fragility. Further, we will test whether fragility in cortical bone is a predictor of fragility in cancellous bone. Finally, we will conduct ultrasound measurements to identify an ultrasound parameter that is sensitive to the presence of damage and could be used for early diagnosis of stress fractures.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE