Accession Number:

ADA402627

Title:

Army Simulations: Moving Toward Efficient Collective Training Sims

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2002-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

51.0

Abstract:

The U.S. Army spends millions of dollars to develop and implement simulations for training. Simulations allow the Army to train commanders and staffs in a wide range of tasks. Simulations have evolved into complex software and hardware programs designed to allow the Army to conduct collective training using wide area networks to increase the scope of training events. The Army has placed great emphasis on simulations as part of efforts to reduce training costs. These collective training tools have become vastly more complex and greater in scope, This monograph asks whether or not the simulations currently being run to conduct collective training and those that are planned for the future can be more efficient. Current simulations are not as interoperable and portable as they can be. Portability and interoperability are important in allowing simulations to be accessed from a variety of locations and computers. Simulations do not employ like technologies they are not developed with specific training objectives in mind and they are not subject to a single unifying set of standards. The Army can save both in personnel costs and transportation by increasing access to simulations. There are several reasons that simulations are not as efficient as they can be. The Army is not applying a unifying, specific set of technology standards to the models and simulations community that is compatible with the rest of the Armys architecture. Additionally, the simulations are being built to meet very general goals and objectives. The lack of specific goals enables programs to seek greater, and perhaps unneeded, fidelity in simulations and the latest technology. This technology is not compatible with the rest of the Armys architecture.

Subject Categories:

  • Computer Programming and Software
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE