Accession Number:

ADA402489

Title:

Measurement of the Effectiveness of a Screening Tool to Detect Injuries and Improve Readiness Among Combat Medic Students

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.

Corporate Author:

ARMY (5TH) HQ FORT SAM HOUSTON TX

Report Date:

2002-02-01

Pagination or Media Count:

34.0

Abstract:

Injury rates among Combat Medic Advanced Individual Training have been reported to be approximately 24 for men and 24-30 for women. The highest rate of Initial injury incidence for men and women occurs during the first week of training, possibly due to students arriving with injuries or symptoms that can quickly progress to an injury. This evaluation was designed to assess whether early screening and intervention would reduce the number of students on limited duty profile, trim down limited duty days, or decrease end-of-cycle holdovers due to musculoskeletal injury. Early screening and intervention was defined as identifying and referring at risk students to health care professionals, prior to beginning traditional physical training. Students N 291 from one company were divided into three groups. Students from the first group was screened and referred for early evaluation and intervention by health care providers HCP using a newly developed screening tool. Students in the second group were screened by drill sergeants DS using the new tool. Those in the third group followed the traditional methods for entering the medical system. Results revealed that both HCPs and DSs could accurately identify students with injuries 92 and 80 respectively. The screening and referral process did not reduce the number of students receiving a limited duty profile, the length of the profiles, or the holdover rate p 0.05. Other findings included an overall injury rate of 34 with approximately 40 of injured students either arriving with an injury or sustaining an injury shortly after arrival. Although formal screening of students is not recommended, it is suggested that leaders encourage students to seek medical attention during the early part of their training for signs and symptoms indicative of injury.

Subject Categories:

  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE