Accession Number:

ADA399741

Title:

Emergency Spending Under the Budget Enforcement Act

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE (U S CONGRESS) WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

34.0

Abstract:

At the end of the 105th Congress, lawmakers approved 21.4 billion in emergency spending as part of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for 1999. That is the highest level of emergency spending enacted in the 1990s, excluding spending for the Persian Gulf War. The 1999 funds addressed a wide variety of purposes ranging from increased security at U.S. embassies and a continuation of peacekeeping efforts in Bosnia to aiding U.S. farmers affected by adverse weather. Many people have questioned the extent to which the 21.4 billion constitutes spending for true emergencies. Emergency is not clearly defined in budget process law. Under procedures that have been in effect since 1991, emergency spending is generally whatever the Congress and the President deem it to be. Emergency spending has been more than just the funding typically provided to the Federal Emergency Management Agency FEMA to respond to natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods. It has also included military funding for Operation Desert Storm in fiscal years 1991 and 1992, spending in the wake of such events as the riots in Los Angeles 1992 and the terrorist bombing in Oklahoma City 1995, and funding for peacekeeping efforts in Bosnia 1997.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Safety Engineering

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE