Accession Number:

ADA394480

Title:

Enhancing Malaria Vaccine Development by the Naval Medical Research Center

Descriptive Note:

Final rept 25 Ja 2000-30 Sep 2001

Corporate Author:

CAMBRIDGE SCIENTIFIC INC CAMBRIDGE MA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2001-09-26

Pagination or Media Count:

18.0

Abstract:

A priority of DoD is to develop effective vaccines for preventing malaria. Developing malaria vaccines is complicated by the complexity of the parasite and of the human hosts response to the infection. Developing sustainably effective vaccines requires a vaccine delivery system that can accommodate a complex variety of biologicals targeted for immune stimulation. In this project, DNA plasmid-based vaccines were encapsulated within biodegradable polymer microparticles using proprietary techniques. The delivery vehicle was designed to protect the pDNA-based vaccine from degradation and provide a sustained release of the vaccine over time. In vitro approximately 60 to 80 percent of the plasmid was released within 24 hours. The plasmid was then released at a controlled rate close to 1 percent per day for 21 days. The total amount of plasmid released after 21 days ranged between 70 and 90 percent. In vivo, mice received a subcutaneous injection of particles. Although there were no detectable antibody or Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses two weeks post-immunization, previous data support the fact that optimal immune responses occur when vaccines are administrated intramuscularly. Additional studies will be undertaken in Phase II to look at intramuscular injection of pDNApolymer-based vaccines in parallel with naked pDNA controls to establish efficacy of vaccines encapsulated within the polymer particles.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Pharmacology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE