Accession Number:

ADA390890

Title:

The Rise and Fall of the DINA in Chile; 1974-1977 and The Social, Economic, and Political Causes of Bureaucratic-Authoritarianism; Argentina, Brazil, and Venezuela

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

TEXAS UNIV AT AUSTIN

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2001-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

174.0

Abstract:

Early on the morning of September 11, 1973, the Chilean Air Force bombed and strafed the presidential palace in downtown Santiago. Soon after, army units assaulted the burning building with tanks and infantry. This stunning attack ended the socialist presidency of Salvador Allende and brought to a close four decades of uninterrupted constitutional rule in Chile, but the fighting did not end there. The military junta that seized power to end Allendes Marxist experiment perceived themselves to be at war with the forces of the Chilean Left. Yet this would not be a conventional war fought on the fields of battle, rather a subversive war fought in the shadows and in the minds of the people. The dictator who emerged as the sole power in Chile after the coup, General Augusto Pinochet, required a new organization to engage the enemy in this different type of war. The Direccion de Inteligencia Nacional or DINA filled that role.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Humanities and History

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE