Accession Number:

ADA375870

Title:

Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Phase II - Evaulation of Alternatives

Descriptive Note:

Final rept

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS ENVIRONMENTAL LAB

Report Date:

2000-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

167.0

Abstract:

This report documents Phase II of a three-phase study to develop a Long-Term Management Strategy LTMS for Pearl Harbor. Physical and chemical characterization and contaminant pathway testing and analysis of Pearl Harbor sediment were performed for the proposed Waipio Peninsula confined disposal facility CDF. Modeling was performed to support designmanagementoperations decision making and contaminant pathway analysis. Physical characterization included a number of geotechnical tests including grain-size analysis, Atterberg limits, soil classification, specific gravity, moisture content, self-weight and standard oedometer consolidation, and sedimentation. Chemical characterization included bulk sediment chemical analysis, toxicity characteristics leaching procedure TCLP, and ambient water chemical analysis. Pathway testing included the modified elutriate test for effluent quality, the simplified laboratory runoff procedure SLRP for runoff quality, and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid DTPA extraction for plant uptake. Using characterization data, leachate quality was predicted based on equilibrium partitioning of the contaminants between the soil and water. Air quality was estimated from computation of contaminant volatilization. The results of the Phase II study show that disposal of Pearl Harbor dredged material unsuitable for ocean disposal in an upland CDF on Waipio Peninsula is technically feasible. Disposal in an upland CDF poses no significant impacts on human health. Potential contaminant in releases by effluent, runoff, plant uptake, and animal uptake pathways pose small environmental impacts that should be acceptable with proper operation, management, and controls. Copper, arsenic, and ammonia concentrations in the effluent and runoff exceed water quality standards for toxicity but except for ammonia are similar to the contaminant concentrations in the background site water.

Subject Categories:

  • Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies
  • Solid Wastes and Pollution and Control

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE