Accession Number:

ADA374955

Title:

The 14th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, Infantry

Descriptive Note:

Strategy research rept.

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2000-01-12

Pagination or Media Count:

91.0

Abstract:

The 14th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, Infantry was in the greatest number of battles, captured the most enemy flags, and suffered the highest number of combat casualties of any Connecticut regiment in the Civil War. On August 23,1862, the regiment was mustered into federal service, and one month later, received its baptism of fire. On September 17,1862, at Bloody Lane during the battle at Antietam, the 14th Regiments soldiers and officer, although under fire for the first time, behaved with great gallantry despite their limited training. The 14th Regiment participated in thirtyfour combat operations and served with distinction in the major battles of the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac. The 14th Regiment fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Bristow Station, Mortons Ford,the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, the siege at Petersburg, Reams Station, and the surrender of General Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. It is important to understand how a soldier world view influenced his commitment to combat and military service. This studys thesis is that Sergeant Hirsts and the 14th Regiment soldiers world views were relevant to their actions, are relevant in the military today, and are relevant in the future. Sergeant Hirsts and the 14th Regiment soldiers world views helped motivate them to fight with valor and gallantry, behave like veterans, and fully maintain the honor of the United States and Connecticut at Antietam in September 1862 and in subsequent combat operations. Lieutenant Colonel Sanford H. Perkins, commanding the 14th Regiment, reported at the battle of Antietam that our men, hastily raised and without drill behaved like veterans, and fully maintained the honor of the Union and our native State. If world view is important to battlefield success, then how might an effective world view be propagated in the current United States all-volunteer army.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE