Accession Number:

ADA359344

Title:

Allocation of Attention with Head-Up Displays

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON DC OFFICE OF AVIATION MEDICINE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

19.0

Abstract:

Two experiments examined the effects of display location head up vs. head down and image intensityclutter on flight path performance and mid-air target detection in a general aviation cruise flight environment. In Experiment 1, a low-fidelity simulation, both near-domain and far-domain Instrumentation were presented at the same optical distance. Detection of commanded flight changes and maintenance of desired flight path flight were generally better in the head-down condition, an advantage attributed to the superior image contrast ratios in that condition. In contrast, target detection was superior with the head-up display, reflecting an attentional tradeoff Experiment 2 was performed with pilots viewing far-domain imagery and airborne targets on an Evans and Sutherland display positioned near optical infinity, head-up display HUD imagery at the same optical distance, and head-down imagery at a near distance typical of the instrument panel. The degree of clutter was also varied and image contrast ratios were equated between head-up and head-down viewing conditions. Flight performance was equivalent between the HUD and head-down locations. However, detection of both near-domain events commanded changes and far-domain targets was better in the HUD condition, revealing the HUD benefit of reduced scanning. Adding extra information clutter to the HUD inhibited detection of both events in both head-up and head-down locations. However, this clutter cost was diminished for far-domain target detection if the added information was low-lighted. Flight performance was superior in clear weather, when the true horizon was available for viewing. The data provided little evidence that attention was modulated in depth near vs. far domains, but rather suggested that attention was modulated between tasks flight control and detection.

Subject Categories:

  • Infrared Detection and Detectors

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE