Accession Number:

ADA359049

Title:

Exploring the Characteristics of Personal Victims Using the National Crime Victimization Survey.

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis,

Corporate Author:

AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSONAFB OH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

127.0

Abstract:

This thesis endeavors to investigate the effects of different individual-level and household-level characteristics such as marital status, employment, and active lifestyle on personal victimization prevalence, incidence and concentration. The main attributes of interest explored in this analysis targets vulnerability, opportunity, attractiveness, and area population. Two statistical methods were used to investigate these hypotheses, logistical regression for victimization prevalence, and negative binomial regression for victimization incidence and concentration. Results were in accord with empirical expectations of all hypotheses. The evidence clearly suggests that there are individual-level and household-level characteristics that influence prevalence, incidence, and concentration. Evidence from the model of concentration implies that although there are characteristics that are shared by victims, not all characteristics that influence ones chances of becoming a victim seem significant for repeat victims. Further the measure of overdispersion from the negative binomial analysis of concentration suggests that there was very little unexplained heterogeneity when compared to the analysis of incidence. Hence the statistically significant explanatory variables in this model accurately captures the characteristics shared by many repeat personal victims.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE