Accession Number:

ADA359003

Title:

Making Decisions about U.S.-Japan Security Relations: Toward a Limited Forward-Deployment in the 21st Century

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

94.0

Abstract:

The end of the Cold War calls for new U.S. policies in Asia. To maintain stability and prosperity in the Asia Pacific region, the U.S. needs to restructure its forward-deployed presence. This restructuring will satisfy both domestic pressures and the security concerns of the countries in the region. The first part of this thesis will examine the relationship between Japan and the U.S. from the end of World War II through the end of the U.S.-Soviet Cold War and how this policy is developed within the United States. The next chapters will he devoted to the external factors that influence the U.S.-Japan alliance including waning public opinion in Japan for support of U.S. troops, the Asian economic crisis, and fears of Japanese militarism and of revived nationalism within Japan. This thesis will suggest ways to calm these fears including the continued development of regional security groups. Such measures represent a tremendous task which, if accomplished, will allow for the reduction of the U.S. forces in the region without the creation of a power vacuum. This thesis argues in favor of a reduction that gives primacy to U.S. naval forces in the region, which could serve to satisfy the above concerns.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Intelligence

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE