Accession Number:

ADA357866

Title:

Domestic Information Warfare: The Department of Defense's Role in the Civil Defense of the National Information Infrastructure.

Descriptive Note:

Monograph rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-05-21

Pagination or Media Count:

82.0

Abstract:

Now more than ever every facet of society relies on the NII to facilitate critical information related activities. Entities around the world have not ignored this transformation and seek to steal, disrupt, and interdict the U.S.s key information processes. It is this reliance on the NII and the security threats it faces that force policy makers to answer the question who should protect the NII Seemingly, the DoD is well positioned to take the lead role in protecting the NII. However, authorizing DoD control over NII protection ignores many issues. Analyzing vulnerabilities to the DII illustrates the gravity of the problem the entire NII faces. The NII faces an increasing threat from hackers, and rogue agents bent on damaging the DoDs information based processes. Countering these threats requires developing a comprehensive NII protection strategy. Correspondingly, developing a strategy for protecting the NII requires defining several strategic concepts of Centers of Gravity, objective, end state, and key tasks. Along with strategic concepts, several critical environmental paradigms such as changing mediums of warfare and the source of future power also effect decisions of who should protect the NII. In light of environmental paradigms and strategic concepts, the issue of whether the DoD can serve as lead agent in NII protection begins to take shape. While arguments such as experience in matters related national security appear to point toward the DoD playing the central role in NII protection, the underlying rationale is limiting and shortsighted. The NIIs distributed nature, constitutionally mandated rights, and the needs of a pluralistic society, all argue against the DoD playing a lead role in protecting the NII. While the DoD should not play the lead role, it does have the capacity to take leadership in several key sub-task areas. First, the DoD should be the lead agent facilitating discussion about national incident and consequence management plans.

Subject Categories:

  • Information Science
  • Electrical and Electronic Equipment

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE