Accession Number:

ADA357765

Title:

The U.S. and Australian Relationship Into the Twenty-First Century.

Descriptive Note:

Monograph rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-05-21

Pagination or Media Count:

65.0

Abstract:

This monograph examines the U.S. - Australian relationship as the world approaches the twenty-first century. Since the end of World War II Australia has maintained a close defense relationship with the U.S., which has been the guarantor of her independence. This relationship was formalized with the ANZUS treaty of 1951 and although global circumstances have changed the alliance remains the centerpiece of Australian defense strategy and U.S. regional engagement within the Asian Pacific. In 1972 President Nixon articulated the Guam doctrine, which required all U.S. treaty partners to provide for their own defense. This doctrine forced Australia to review its defense strategy, and over the next 25 years, Australia developed a comprehensive strategic defense policy. These policies have been published in a series of government strategy papers, known as White Papers. These policy papers gradually shifted Australias strategy from forward defense as a member of a U.S. led coalition to depth in defense and finally to self-reliance. As this metamorphosis occurred the U.S. linkage remained strong. Whether fighting as part of a coalition led by the U.S., or relying on U.S. logistical support Australia remains tied to the U.S. in defense matters. In the 1980s there was a subtle shift towards a more independent regional engagement policy designed to demonstrate that Australias was regionally focused on the economies of the Asian Pacific. However, as each of the Australian defense strategies evolved the ties with the U.S. remained critical. This reliance on U.S. support creates a dilemma for Australia. While it attempts to be seen as an Asian neighbor its close Western association has excluded it from key regional forums. To shed this and become integrated into Asia it must demonstrate a more independent stance and possibly a movement toward a nonaligned status.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Defense Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE