Accession Number:

ADA357556

Title:

A Content Analysis of Army Newspapers Based in the Continental United States (CONUS) to Determine Editorial Differences Between Military and Civilian Editors.

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis,

Corporate Author:

MARSHALL UNIV HUNTINGTON WV W PAGE PITT SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATIONS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

76.0

Abstract:

A content analysis of four civilian enterprise Army newspapers published in the United States was conducted to determine if editorial differences in content and tone existed between military and civilian editors. Both hypotheses were supported by the findings. Based upon a review of literature and Army policy, Army newspapers were considered to have more in common with corporate or company employee publications than with conventional newspapers published under First Amendment freedoms. This is because they are funded for the purpose of conveying information to and from the soldiers and the command they serve. Articles appearing on page one and two were coded for content of news and tone of coverage. Findings indicated military editors are more likely than civilian editors to set a command information agenda for their readers by framing that type of news more prominently. Findings also indicated military editors emphasized news of a positive tone by a far greater margin than civilian editors. The researcher concludes that military editors are more likely to view their publication as a tool of organizational communication, while civilian editors are more likely to report and frame the news in a manner more similar to commercial newspapers. Furthermore, military editors may run the risk of losing credibility with the audience by focusing on predominantly positive news.

Subject Categories:

  • Information Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE