Accession Number:

ADA349848

Title:

Scientific Coordination and Adaptive Management and Experimental Restoration of Longleaf Pine Community Structure, Function, and Composition

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 31 Dec 97-30 Mar 98

Corporate Author:

FLORIDA UNIV GAINESVILLE

Report Date:

1998-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

257.0

Abstract:

This report addresses five aspects of sandhill restoration related to soils, sand pine removal, and responses of vegetation, arthropods, and birds to experimental treatments. Soil texture more strongly explained vegetation patterns than soil chemistry. Percent silt was positively correlated to plant species richness. Plant species richness initially decreased following sand pine removal, but then increased. Few plant species only decreased or only increased. Seventy-eight percent of planted longleaf pine seedlings survived their first year. Fellinggirdling achieved the highest midstory reduction, followed by hexazinone and then burning. Fire stimulated plant species richness and graminoids. In spring 1996, overall results indicated that burning increased arthropod density and biomass more than other treatments. Groundcover measures of vegetation were positive predictors of many arthropods, whereas tree variables were not. In spring 1997, only two bird species significantly responded to treatments. Red-cockaded woodpeckers were significantly more detected in hexazinone treatments. Pine warblers responded positively to fellinggirdling. Foraging observations of common wintering birds showed that birds used longleaf pine more than any other tree species in both treatment and reference sites.

Subject Categories:

  • Biology
  • Soil Mechanics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE