Accession Number:

ADA346563

Title:

Prior Mammography Utilization: Does It Explain Black-White Differences in Breast Cancer Outcomes?.

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. 15 Apr 96-14 Apr 98

Corporate Author:

BOSTON UNIV MEDICAL CENTER MA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1998-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

35.0

Abstract:

Older black women are diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer more frequently than whites possibly because they receive fewer mammograms. We investigated the extent to which regular mammography use explains black-white differences in stage at diagnosis among older women with breast cancer. We studied black and white women, aged greater than or equal 67, diagnosed with breast cancer from 1987-1993, residing in three SEER Program areas. Women were classified based on their mammography use during the 2 years before diagnosis non users no prior mammograms, regular users at least 2 mammograms at least 10 months apart, or peri-diagnosis users only mammograms within 3 months before diagnosis. Stage was classified as early in situlocal or late regionaldistant. Black women were more likely to be nonusers of mammography OR2.19, 95 Cl, 1.65-2.92 and to be diagnosed with late-stage disease OR1 .78,95 Cl, 1.34-2.35 than white women. When stratified by prior mammography use, the black-white difference in stage occurred only among nonusers adjusted OR1 .54,95 Cl, 1.04-2.28. Among regular users, blacks and whites were diagnosed at similar stages adjusted OR1 .01,95 Cl, 0.54-1.88. These results suggest that differences in stage between older blacks and whites are related to prior mammography use. Increased regular mammography use may result in a shift toward earlier stage disease and narrow observed differences in stage between older black and white women.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE