Accession Number:

ADA339501

Title:

Peacekeeping Tasks in the METL: The Dilemma of a Direct Support Artillery.

Descriptive Note:

Monograph rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1997-12-18

Pagination or Media Count:

51.0

Abstract:

Since the end of the Cold War in 1989 the United States Army is finding itself conducting more and more operations that fall under the category of peace operations or stability operations. Additionally our National Security Strategy states that these types of operations will become the most frequent challenge for the armed forces. Although these missions are not new to the Army they do entail conducting certain tasks that are not usually trained for by the units deploying on these missions. This dilemma appears to be a result of our current training doctrine. The cornerstone manuals for Army training reflect a warfighting focus based on a pre 1990 environment. By strict doctrine, units are not permitted to place peacekeeping tasks on their METL. This monograph examines the logic of excluding peacekeeping from a units METL using a case study from Bosnia. The monograph defines peacekeeping in terms of the environment and roles of the military in peace operations. Current Army training doctrine is addressed to idenfl the limitations that current doctrine places on units identified to conduct peacekeeping missions. The case study focuses on the direct support artillery battalions from 1st Armored Division who were part of the IFOR in Bosnia. By looking at predeployment training and the conduct of peacekeeping tasks, several shortfalls are identified which can be traced back to possible problems with current training doctrine. Finally, the monograph concludes that the training philosophy in FM 25-100 and FM 25-101 is sound but there should be allowances made for units to place peacekeeping tasks on the METL. Local Handbooks and other unit developed materials may be necessary to define tasks not covered in war planning or MTPs. Using this strategy a unit could conduct required peace training while still being prepared for combat.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Defense Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE