Accession Number:

ADA339477

Title:

Enhancing the Training and Development of the Task Force Staff.

Descriptive Note:

Monograph rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1997-12-18

Pagination or Media Count:

59.0

Abstract:

This monograph examines how the task force commander and executive officer can enhance the training and professional development of the battalion coordinating staff. The National Training Center continues to report that task force staffs continue to demonstrate substandard staff skills. This includes poor individual staff officer proficiency, inadequate staff section proficiency, and This study relies heavily on contemporary training experiences. Observations from the National Training Center Take Home Packages and various products available through the Center for Army Lesson Learned. Additionally, supporting ideas and observations are also available in many contemporary military journals. The initial portions of this monograph were developed from two primary studies. Beginning in 1963 Doctor J. A. Olmstead began a thirty year study on the subject of Battle Staff lntegration. The fruits of his labors was published in 1992 by the Institute for Defense Analysis. The RAND Corporation published a study of Battalion Level Command and Control at the National Training Center in 1994. The section dealing with the basic components of learning organizations was drawn primarily from Peter Senges work The Fifth Discipline. His ideas are one of the hot topics in the contemporary business world and additional insights were found in many business journals. The Harvard Business Review has published numerous articles covering the various aspects of the learning organization. This monograph concludes that the current training doctrine is sufficient for training and professionally developing the task force coordinating staff. Peter Senges concept of the learning organization and his five learning disciplines do provide insight into the training process and can be used to reinforce current training doctrine.

Subject Categories:

  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE