Accession Number:

ADA314796

Title:

Response of the Lungs to Low Frequency Underwater Sound.

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 1 Sep 93-31 Dec 95,

Corporate Author:

GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Report Date:

1996-01-31

Pagination or Media Count:

29.0

Abstract:

Because of their high compliance, the lungs are probably more vulnerable to damage by high intensity, low frequency underwater sound than any other part of the human anatomy. The objective of this research was to study the effects of low frequency 50-1200 Hz underwater sound on the lungs to assist in estimating safe exposure conditions for swimmers and divers. To accurately assess the risk, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of the vibrational response of the lungs as well as knowledge of the potential damage mechanism. Lung resonances in an animal model pigs and humans were measured at low intensities using NIVAMS Non-Invasive Vibration Amplitude Measurement System. The results from the human subjects indicated that the fundamental lung resonance was below the lowest frequency used 50 Hz and that a secondary resonance appeared in the 100 to 200 Hz range for subjects with their head above the surface. Also an attempt was made to determine damage mechanisms by exposing animals to high intensity sound while submerged. There was no damage detected for the three pigs exposed to sound pressure levels up to 177 dB.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Acoustics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE