Accession Number:

ADA282361

Title:

Energy Effects of Ending the Department of Defense's Use of Chemicals that Deplete Stratospheric Ozone

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

RAND CORP SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

108.0

Abstract:

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require that U.S. manufacturers phase out the production of an important class of chemicals by the end of the century. In an executive order in February 1992, President Bush accelerated the phaseout to the beginning of 1996. This phaseout is expected to affect operations in the Department of Defense DoD. Based on recent modeling and data collection, a scientific and political consensus has formed around the idea that emissions of these man-made chemicals deplete stratospheric ozone. These ozone depleting chemicals or ODCs include chlorofluorocarbons CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform. The United States is the largest user of these chemicals in the world, and DoD is the largest user of these chemicals in the United States.

Subject Categories:

  • Atmospheric Physics
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Air Pollution and Control

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE