Accession Number:

ADA281400

Title:

Federal Dairy Programs. Insights into Past Provide Perspective for the Future

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC RESOURCES COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIV

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-03-07

Pagination or Media Count:

11.0

Abstract:

The General Accounting Office presents a statement for the record on the implications of current dairy policy. As consideration begins on the 1990 farm bill, one needs only to reflect on changes that occurred to the dairy industry in the 1980s to understand the dynamics of that industry since the 1930s--the beginning of federal efforts to promote stable dairy markets, ensure adequate supplies, stabilize prices, and improve farmer income. The 1980s began with such excessive milk production that large government purchases of dairy products were required, costing the taxpayers about 17.2 billion during that decade. In fact, the inventory of these products was so large that the federal government had difficulty giving them away. However, as the 1980s ended and the 1990s have begun, federal dairy surpluses of cheese and non-fat dry milk have declined to such an extent that traditional donation programs have little or no dairy products for donation. In addition, while consumer prices for retail dairy products rose an average of 2 percent annually in the mid- and late 1980s they increased by 6 percent in 1989

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Food, Food Service and Nutrition

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE