Accession Number:

ADA280471

Title:

Changing Roles of the United States and Japan in the Security of Southeast Asia

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1994-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

148.0

Abstract:

The hypothesis of this study is that the United States and Japan have important and complementary roles to play in contributing to the peace and stability in Southeast Asia in spite of the end of the Cold War. Historical perspectives with regard to Southeast Asia since the withdrawal of the United States from Vietnam until the end of the Cold War are provided as the foundations for change. The national development of the nations of Southeast Asia, the implications of the rapid economic growth of China, and the military buildup in the region since the end of the Cold War are examined. Similarly, the rising transnational problems of Southeast Asia including piracy, drug abuse, a burgeoning population and environmental issues are addressed. The basic changes in American policies toward the region, including the implications of the withdrawal from the military facilities in the Philippines, and the impact of the reductions in the military budget are examined. Likewise, basic Japanese policies toward Southeast Asia, particularly in light of recent dramatic changes in Japanese internal politics, the effects of the Persian Gulf War, and the Cambodian experience, are discussed. Southeast Asia, ASEAN, APEC, ARF, Asia, China, Transnational problems, Piracy, Illicit drugs, Demographics, Subic, Japan, Cambodia.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE