Accession Number:

ADA277035

Title:

Technology Security Policy: From the Cold War to the New World Order

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

122.0

Abstract:

This thesis examines U.S. technology security policy in a transitional period marked by a rapidly changing security environment and an era of economic globalization. It provides an historical analysis of this policy since the onset of the Cold War and a financial analysis of the 40 million budget request for technology security, counter-proliferation, and export controls in the Clinton Administrations FY 1994 defense budget presentation. The historical analysis is based largely on the evolution and roles of two multilateral control regimes -- CoCom and the MTCR. The crux of this analysis is a detailed examination of the fate of the 40 million request as it moved through the congressional budget process. This analysis identifies problems and policy issues surrounding resource allocation for technology security. Based on the treatment of the budget request by the defense committees of Congress, a number of conclusions were drawn. Although technology security is considered a high priority item by both the executive and legislative branches of government, Congress appropriated funding for only 20 percent of the Administrations request. Significant decreases are attributed to inter-agency turf struggles, the slowness with which DoD policy-making positions were filled, and an initial spending plan that was perhaps overly ambitious and prematurely presented. Ultimately, two reviewing bodies were born out of legislative compromise however, potentially redundant reporting likelihood of a decisive review of current proliferation policy.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE