Accession Number:

ADA276961

Title:

Stress Perceptions of Soldiers Participating in Training at the Chemical Defense Training Facility: the Mediating Effects of Motivation, Experience, and Confidence Level

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

ARMY RESEARCH LAB ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1994-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

47.0

Abstract:

An investigation was conducted by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory ARL and funded by the Physiological and Psychological Effects of the Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical NBC Environment and Sustained Operations on Systems in Combat P2NBC2 program to assess the psychological reactions of soldiers in mission-oriented protective posture MOPP IV participating in training in a simulated chemical agent environment and in a toxic agent environment. A total of 155 soldiers who participated in the basic course junior enlisted and the advanced courses officer and noncommissioned officer NCO groups as part of their military occupational specialty MOS training volunteered for the study. The junior enlisted group reported significant increases in anxiety during four sessions as they approached the toxic agent portion of the training. The more experienced groups showed a small, but significant increase in anxiety during sessions. Their level of hostility, a component of stress that usually relates to levels of personal frustration, decreased significantly from the time of their initial testing to just before the training began. Since the initial session occurred 1 to 2 weeks before the U.S. Army Chemical Defense Training Facility CDTF training, the elevated frustration level may be a reflection of their overall experiences within the intensive chemical defense training program. A significant drop in reported fatigue between the pre- and post- training sessions may indicate a certain level of vigilance gained by participating in the training. Anxiety, Efficacy, Motivation, Chemical defense, Fatigue, Psychological stress, Confidence, Hostility, Soldiers.

Subject Categories:

  • Stress Physiology
  • Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE