Accession Number:

ADA276921

Title:

United Nations' Peacekeeping: The United States Should Proceed Slowly in Supporting UN Efforts to Expand Its Role

Descriptive Note:

Research rept. Aug 1992-Apr 1993

Corporate Author:

INDUSTRIAL COLL OF THE ARMED FORCES WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

45.0

Abstract:

During the cold war, the United States and the Soviet Union, as permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, effectively kept the United Nations from carrying out its intended role as the centerpiece of the international collective security system. However, since the end of the cold war, the number of U.N. peacekeeping missions has more than doubled--13 were initiated between 1948 and 1987, but 14 more since 1988. In 1992, the U.N. Secretary General recommended ways of strengthening the capacity of the United Nations to conduct peacekeeping operations. Although, the U.S. National Security Strategy highlights the United Nations as a vehicle to help facilitate and maintain peace in increasingly difficult conflicts, the United States did not embrace the Secretary Generals proposals. The United Nations has demonstrated its effectiveness in helping to control and defuse small-scale, limited conflicts. To expect more in the diverse world that has emerged since the end of the cold war could endanger the ability of the United Nations to continue in this relatively modest role. Fundamental financial and management reforms must be undertaken, U.S. law may constrain U.S. involvement and, most importantly, a U.N. peacekeeping organization as envisioned by the Secretary General could drag the United States into conflicts that have no connection to U.S. interests.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Government and Political Science
  • Geography
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE