Accession Number:

ADA276784

Title:

Human Rights and Nation-building: Future Imperatives of U.S. Foreign Policy

Descriptive Note:

Research rept.

Corporate Author:

INDUSTRIAL COLL OF THE ARMED FORCES WASHINGTON DC

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

36.0

Abstract:

The 1992 deployment of U.S. military forces to Somalia presented a series of new challenges to the United States and the world community. Foremost among these are the questions of what criteria will be used for embarking on future humanitarian operations and for terminating such interventions. With the demise of the Soviet Union, the principle threat to this nation and the rest of the developed world is regional instability stemming from deteriorating socioeconomic conditions. The United States and the enlightened world community are faced with both realist and idealist foreign policy imperatives to intervene in selected human emergencies. A formal international framework under United Nations auspices is needed to evaluate human emergencies and provide a wide range of responsive actions. Among U.N. options must exist a nation-building capability -- non-military forces specifically trained to address the root causes of national instability and provide the administrative and security functions needed to restore civil order and economic stability. The United States is obligated to provide global leadership to the enlightened world community in this effort.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE