Accession Number:

ADA273161

Title:

The U.S. Government and the Apache Indians, 1871-1876: A Case Study in Counterinsurgency

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis 1 Aug 1992-5 Jun 1993

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-06-05

Pagination or Media Count:

209.0

Abstract:

Many historians contend that the U.S. Governments first real experience in countering an insurgency came during the Philippine Insurrection of 1899 and they classify previous conflicts with the American Indians as limited wars of conquest. In fact, the long struggle between the government and the Apache Indians stemmed from complex social, political and economic factors, and bears all the earmarks of a traditional, or secessionist, insurgency. This study evaluates the methods used to suppress the Apache insurgency by applying the principles of modern counterinsurgency doctrine. The strength of the governments approach was in its ability to conduct a short, decisive military campaign which defeated most of the hostile bands and induced others to surrender. The major weakness lay in the governments inability to develop a balanced national strategy for dealing with the insurgency. Lack of cooperation between civilian and military agencies led to failed attempts at pacification, an ineffective reservation system, and continued conflict. The experience of the U.S. Government with the Apaches confirms the validity of much of our current doctrine, and offers lessons which can be applied to modern counterinsurgency operations. Apache Wars, Apache Conflicts, Apache Indians, Counterinsurgency, Guerrilla Warfare, Unconventional Warfare

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE