Accession Number:

ADA261816

Title:

American Persian Gulf Policy after the Gulf War

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1992-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

129.0

Abstract:

American policy in the Persian Gulf since the end of the Gulf War has dangerously overemphasized military instruments to protect United States interests in the region. This military focus suggests that threats to American interests are external and visible. At the same time, it neglects the challenges posed to U.S. interests by internal political upheaval in the pro-American regimes of the Gulf Cooperation Council GCC and ignores the societal disruptions associated with modernizing societies. Despite their considerable oil wealth, these polities will be increasingly vulnerable to instability if the regimes in power continue their monopoly on political power. Moreover, the highly visible and active presence of American armed forces in the Gulf today intensifies the perception of the United States as an imperial super power and unknowingly threatens to undermine the stability of the GCC states by providing opposition groups with a powerful symbol with which to challenge the political status quo.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE