Accession Number:

ADA261783

Title:

U.S. Interests in European Security Following the Cold War

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1992-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

106.0

Abstract:

The need for U.S. involvement in European security affairs did not end with the Cold War. History provides evidence to support this. Periods in which the United States pursued neutralist or isolationist policies towards Europe resulted in instability on the continent. However, since 1949, the United States has pursued an alliance policy and Europe has experienced relative peace. With the end of the Cold War, the United States must re-evaluate its interests in Europe. These interests include the future of Russia, the stability of Eastern and Western Europe, the future of European security institutions, and a place at the European economic and political table. These interests must be kept in mind as the United States analyzes associated issues regarding further reductions in the defense budget and in the U.S. military presence in Europe. These issues include the U.S. security guarantee to Europe, the cost of U.S. involvement in the Atlantic Alliance, the search for a peace dividend, and European support for a continued U.S. military presence on the continent. After examining these issues, the thesis concludes that further reductions in the U.S. defense budget and the U.S. military presence in Europe must proceed at a responsible rate if the United States is to avoid past mistakes and preserve European stability.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE