Accession Number:

ADA255949

Title:

Perceptual-Motor Control in Human-Computer Interaction

Descriptive Note:

Doctoral thesis

Corporate Author:

MICHIGAN UNIV ANN ARBOR

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1992-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

112.0

Abstract:

This dissertation explores the aspect of human interaction with computers that is to date, not well modelled in cognitive engineering. Complex computer interfaces are becoming more complex in terms of motor movements, the menus are arranged hierarchically, and the mouse must travel a complex path, either while the button is held down or not. Previous models of the time and effort involved in this movement are inadequate for the complexity of these movements, and do not account for significant variation in design. This dissertation reviews the models, and performs a series of experiments that show that significant extra time is required for walking menus, those that require the button to be held down while the user tracks a complex path down, to the right through a gate, then down to the final target menu item. The extra time was found to be due to increased simple motor contraction, not any more central processing such as remembering to release the button, or a simple explanation having to do with friction with the mouse pad.

Subject Categories:

  • Human Factors Engineering and Man Machine Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE