Accession Number:

ADA255735

Title:

Interactions Between HIV-Infected Monocytes and the Extracellular Matrix: HIV-Infected Monocytes Secrete Neutral Metalloproteases That Degrade Basement Membrane Protein Matrices,

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

WALTER REED ARMY INST OF RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC

Report Date:

1992-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

The frequency of human immunodeficieny virus HIV-infected monocytes that spread on a model basement membrane was about twofold greater than that of a n equal number of uninfected control cells through the initial 12 to 18 h of culture. By 24 h, virtually all HIV-infected and uninfected control cells spread on the basement membrane gel. The frequency of spread cells in the uninfected control population was 10 of total cells by 12 days. In contrast, 30 to 40 of HIV-infected monocytes remained spread through this time interval and formed a dense interdigitated network of cell processes on and into the gel matrix. Invasion of the basement membrane matrix by HIV-infected monocytes suggested increased secretion of proteases able to digest the gel. Indeed, levels of neutral protease activity in culture fluids from HIV-infected monocytes were significantly higher than those from equal numbers of uninfected control cells. High levels of protease activity in culture fluids of HIV-infected monocytes required productive virus infection and were not observed with cells exposed to T cell-tropic HIV isolates. The predominant protease activity in these cultures was a 92-kd neutral metallogelatinase. HIV-induced changes in monocyte metalloprotease activity may be important for extravasation of infected cells to tissue or for the development of AIDS-associated neuropathology, carcinogenesis, and opportunistic infection.HIV-1, Metalloproteases, Basement membrane, Extracellular matrix.

Subject Categories:

  • Biochemistry
  • Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE