Accession Number:

ADA254127

Title:

Adaptive Automation and Human Performance: II. Effects of Shifts in the Level of Automation on Operator Performance

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

CATHOLIC UNIV OF AMERICA WASHINGTON DC COGNITIVE SCIENCE LAB

Report Date:

1991-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

The application of adaptive systems to cockpit automation was discussed in a recent report by Parasuraman et al 1990. Among the issues they raised were the effects of different types of adaptive automation on performance, the adaptive logic used to implement task changes, pilot consent to suggested adaptive changes, the effects of automation failure, and so on. Empirical evidence relevant to these issues from simulator or field studies is still meager. The present studies form part of a program of investigations of these and other human-performance issues related to cockpit automation Parasuraman et al., 1991. Here we briefly report the results of two experiments investigating the effects of shifts in the type and level of automation on operator performance in a multi-task environment. The first study examined the benefits and costs of adaptive automation shifts on operator performance. The second study examined the effects of variations in automation reliability on operator detection of automation failures.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Aircraft Operations
  • Flight Control and Instrumentation

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE