Accession Number:

ADA250820

Title:

Combat Search and Rescue: A Search for Tomorrow

Descriptive Note:

Study project rept.,

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Report Date:

1992-04-14

Pagination or Media Count:

36.0

Abstract:

Combat search and rescue CSAR was born during World War II as attempts to rescue airmen returning from bombing raids in Germany proved viable. In every war since then rescue forces have proven invaluable as they have saved thousands of American lives. The problem has always been the manning and training of rescue forces after the completion of a conflict. Attempts to increase the force structure and the budget have routinely failed due to a lack of interest in peacetime search and rescue and failure to document the capability in wartime. Following the U.S. return from Vietnam the Aerial Rescue Service ARS was mission capable. During the subsequent draw-down of the services it was again gutted. Its nadir was recently when it could not meet the requirements for deployment to Desert Storm. The problems include a lack of force structure and training. Additionally, many of the assets are in the reserve component and are very difficult to deploy on short notice. Most modernized rescue assets have been transferred to the Special Operations Command, including the HH53 helicopters and the HC-130 refuelers. This command currently has the capability to perform CSAR, but not the mission. The Air Staff has recommended four options to solve the problems of rescue in the future. The authors have recommended a fifth option that would transfer command of the ARS from Military Airlift Command and align it with the Air Combat Command, the principal user.

Subject Categories:

  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Escape, Rescue and Survival

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE