Accession Number:

ADA250260

Title:

Army Veterinary Service Role in Low-Intensity Conflict

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1992-04-06

Pagination or Media Count:

68.0

Abstract:

National security of the United States depends on stability in the Western Hemisphere, and this stability in turn depends in large part on the respective governments being able to control disease, malnutrition, and poverty in their exploding populations. In spite of the remarkable trend of democratization in Latin America, there continues to be widespread political unrest and terrorism as fledgling democracies strive for moral legitimacy to govern. Terrorism and insurgency are basically rooted in economic and social inequality that can only be improved by providing a broader and more equitable access to economic resources and the benefits they imply health, education, housing, etc.. The low-intensity conflict environment of Latin America then extends beyond military confrontation. It is characterized more by confrontation between man and his socioeconomic and political situation, of which health and nutrition are integral parts. Properly applied veterinary medicine programs can make a difference in this struggle. They impact on health, economics, and nutrition more than any other single discipline. The Army Veterinary Service has the capability to contribute more in LIC and nation assistance, but its role must be clarified and expanded. The author examines past veterinary civic action experiences, reviews the health component of LIC in Latin America, and proposes recommendations to more effectively use the Army Veterinary Service as a resource in LIC and peacetime engagement activities.

Subject Categories:

  • Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE