Accession Number:

ADA243124

Title:

Vietnam in U.S. Foreign Policy: An Association for the Strategic Balance in Southeast Asia

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

160.0

Abstract:

This thesis asserts that it is critical for the U.S. to re-evaluate its foreign policy towards Vietnam and to begin viewing that countrys strategic potential for meeting future threats to Southeast Asia specifically the Chinese military threat, a threat based on Chinas territorial claims in the South China Sea and an aggressive program of modernization of Chinas military and the Japanese economic threat, a threat reinforced by Japans use of conditional aid, financial control of major industries throughout the region, and a structural dependency on imports of critical raw materials, primarily from Southeast Asia. Americas relations with Vietnam have remained virtually unchanged since U.S. forces were withdrawn in April, 1975. However, the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union have released the U.S. from its need to view Vietnam as an extension of Moscows influence in Southeast Asia. A policy of constructive engagement with Vietnam permits the U.S. to maintain the balance of power in Southeast Asia against encroaching Chinese and Japanese threats. Americas economic interests in Asia, now one-third larger than in Europe, also create an imperative for change and the potential of Vietnam, in resources, manpower, and strategic location, should be made a factor in future policy formation.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science
  • Humanities and History
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE