Accession Number:

ADA242606

Title:

The Interrelationship of Stress, Safety, and Realism in U.S. Marine Corps Ground Combat Individual Skills Training

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis Aug 90-Jun 91,

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-06-07

Pagination or Media Count:

139.0

Abstract:

This thesis studied three critical parameters which significantly influence the effectiveness of individual combat skills training. This training must replicate the parameters expected to be encountered in any real world situation. The closer the leader comes to creating these conditions, the more realistic the training. Realism is enhanced the more it involves the actual stresses of battle. Safety regulations also play an important role as the leader develops realistic training. The interdependence of these three elements requires harmonization for maximum effectiveness. The authors methodological approach to research included a review of existing documentary materials which established current training philosophy, an analysis of the results of a survey sent to Marine Corps combat veterans, and a synopsis of interviews conducted with international officers. In the authors opinion, training is not being conducted as realistically as it could be, causes and countermeasures for battlefield stress are not being formally instructed, and existing safety policies are often unnecessarily restricting the quality of training.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Psychology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE