Accession Number:

ADA242152

Title:

Heat Strain during at-Sea Helicopter Operations in a High Heat Environment and the Effect of Passive Microclimate Cooling

Descriptive Note:

Interim rept. 1988-1989

Corporate Author:

NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

20.0

Abstract:

High heat loads due to engine exhaust intake and high ambient temperatures within a helicopter fuselage during flight, specifically hover, have resulted in reported episodes of symptomatic heat strain among aircrew. An in-flight study was conducted to assess a fuselage ambient temperature during Navy H-3 helicopter at-sea operations in a high heat environment Persian Gulf b presence or absence of any cardiac strain or excessive physiological heat load and c effectiveness of reducing these responses by wearing a protective cooling ice vest.IV. METHODS. Twelve helicopter aircrew were monitored heart rate HR and skin SK and rectal RT temperature in both IV and non- IV conditions during flight while wearing standard flight equipment. CONCLUSIONS. Aircrew performing at-sea helicopter operations in an area of high ambient heat are subject to heat loads that may produce heat stress conditions that can result in marked cardiac and thermal regulatory strain. Wearing of a protective cooling vest appears to reduce this threat.

Subject Categories:

  • Helicopters
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology
  • Air Conditioning, Heating, Lighting and Ventilating

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE