Accession Number:

ADA239355

Title:

Byron on Death

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

90.0

Abstract:

Despite Byrons protestation that, There is to me something so incomprehensible in death, that I can neither speak nor think on the subject to Hobhouse, August 10, 1811, Death is a pervasive theme in Byrons major works, as his beliefs regarding its meaning undergo distinct changes. Although prior to 1815, he did not believe in the immortality of the soul, from 1815 onward, certainly after meeting Shelley in 1816, his work reflects a growing interest in the idea of continuity of identity in some form. In Manfred, the central question is, What after Death In Cain, the question is, Why must we die By 1821, Byrons Detached Thoughts clearly indicates confidence in the souls immortality, although a sweet uncertainty about its ultimate meaning remains. This complexity--belief and uncertainty--is evident in his later work, especially Sardanapalus and Don Juan, and most closely approximates Byrons final attitude toward immortality.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE