Accession Number:

ADA238808

Title:

Women in the Military Cockpit

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 1-30 Jan 91,

Corporate Author:

ARMSTRONG LAB BROOKS AFB TX

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

47.0

Abstract:

Historically women have demonstrated the capacity to be successful aviators. Recent participation of women in combat roles and in military aviation has, however, aroused controversy. The scientific literature pertinent to the role of women in military aviation was reviewed. Cognitive differences between men and women account for less than 5 of the population variance and their implication for aviation is unknown. The effect of cyclic hormone fluctuations on performance is poorly understood. Men are, on the average, larger, stronger, and more fit than women, although there are large variations within each sex and a large overlap between the sexes. Difference in work performance, injury rate, etc., disappear when size, strength and fitness are controlled for. Selection criteria can thus address size, strength, and fitness requirements without reference to sex. Several minor differences of questionable operational significance may exist. Women may be more susceptible to motion sickness, heat stress, radiation cancer and endometriosis, and decompression sickness than men, but may be more resistant to cold stress and altitude sickness. The possibility of fetal damage in the early stages of pregnancy before diagnosis of pregnancy appears to be perhaps the biggest single medical concern in allowing women access to all aviationspace careers.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Biology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE