Accession Number:

ADA238221

Title:

Estimating and Modeling Gene Flow for a Spatially Distributed Species

Descriptive Note:

Technical rept.

Corporate Author:

FLORIDA STATE UNIV TALLAHASSEE DEPT OF STATISTICS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

23.0

Abstract:

This paper models the genetic behavior of a large population of individuals which is divided into colonies. We are studying the relative frequency of an allele Al at a specific locus and over all the colonies. The effects of various migration patterns across colonies on these relative frequencies are studied. Population geneticists have many models to study the effect of geographical subdivision on the evolution of a species. Consider a large population of individuals of a particular species which is to some extent subdivided into colonies. Complete subdivision means that each colony is isolated. At the other extreme is no subdivision. This means that all adults in the entire population are equally likely to mate with all other adults of the opposite sex in the population. It is believed that many species follow mating patterns somewhere between these two extremes. To set the stage for the mathematical models, the necessary genetical terms are collected here. Most organisms are diploid, having chromosomes in pairs, one inherited from each parents gamete sperm or egg cell. To genotype of a diploid individual is the specification of all of its chromosome pairs. It is sometimes sufficient to model a diploid species as if it were haploid. Haploid individuals have only one of each type of chromosome.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE