Accession Number:

ADA237450

Title:

An Assessment of the Nutritional Intake and Energy Expenditure of Unacclimatized U.S. Army Soldiers Living and Working at High Altitude

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 1 Jun 1990-1 Jun 1991

Corporate Author:

ARMY RESEARCH INST OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE NATICK MA

Report Date:

1991-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

154.0

Abstract:

During a recent deployment to Bolivia 3500-4050 m elevation, 35 male soldiers control ate the field rations BMREB. Another 32 male soldiers supplemented and 13 female soldiers ate the field rations plus a high CHO 125 g food supplement. Daily urine samples were obtained. Body weight, foodfluid intake, and food acceptability were recorded for 15 d. A sub-sample of 30 soldiers provided 24-hour urine sample for the first and last two days of the study. Energy expenditure was measured on a sub-sample n12 using doubly labelled water. Caloric intake decreased for the first three days at altitude, picked-up on day four and leveled out thereafter. Mean daily energy intakes were 2140 kcal for the control, 2265 kcal for the supplemented, and 1668 kcal for the female group. Caloric intakes for the male groups were not significantly different. Mean daily energy expenditure was 3549 kcal. Consequently, all groups lost body weight, 3.71 lbs, 3.78 lbs, and 1.16 lbs, respectively. Mean CHO intake was 46, 48, and 52 of the energy intake, respectively. Ration acceptability was good and did not decline over time. These results show that B Rations and the MRE are equally suited for use at altitude as sea level but also demonstrate that soldiers given an ad libitum dietary regimen and a food packet CHO supplement, did not automatically increase their CHO intake. It was concluded, therefore, that if an increase in CHO intake at altitude is desirable then supplementation via a beverage component may be more effective.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Food, Food Service and Nutrition

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE