Accession Number:

ADA237027

Title:

U.S./Japan Burdensharing: Constraints to Increased Japanese Contribution

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis,

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

82.0

Abstract:

This thesis explores issues relevant to U.S.Japan burden sharing. As U.S. defense expenditures are reduced in the 1990s, U.S. allies will be called upon to contribute a greater share to meet common security responsibilities. Japans government faces a multitude of constraints to increasing defense expenditures placed upon them by the U.S., the Japanese public and Japans Asian neighbors. Some of these constraints are affected significantly by Japanese perceptions of U.S. commitment and the Soviet threat. If perceptions of the Soviet threat diminish while perceptions of the U.S. commitment remain strong, Japan may be less inclined to increase their expenditures to the levels called for by the U.S. This thesis explores constraints to increased Japanese defense spending, Japanese perceptions of U.S. commitment, Soviet threat perceptions in Japan, and also indicates areas for increased Japanese contributions to allied defense capabilities.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE