Accession Number:

ADA234981

Title:

The Okinawa Campaign: A Cast Study

Descriptive Note:

Study project,

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1991-04-05

Pagination or Media Count:

112.0

Abstract:

On 1 April 1945, the U.S. ground forces stormed ashore on the Japanese held island of Okinawa. This amphibious assault and the campaign that followed marked not only the largest campaign conducted in the Pacific during World War II, but also the culmination of the lessons learned during over three years of amphibious warfare. As the final joint campaign of the war, it incorporated the principles and techniques which had proven successful during previous operations. Despite interservice differences and continued friction concerning the best means to pursue war aims, the American commanders were veterans. They understood how to synchronize the operations of joint and combined forces to achieve the greatest effect, focused toward single objective - seizure of the island of Okinawa. This case study will examine how joint service coordination and cooperation were exercised among the U.S. ground, air, and sea forces which participated in the campaign. Conversely, an occasional comparison with Japanese deficiencies in joint operations will be drawn. With U. S. military forces being increasingly oriented toward contingency missions, the lessons of this campaign are increasingly relevant.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE