Accession Number:

ADA230617

Title:

Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation

Descriptive Note:

Annual technical rept. 15 May 1989-14 May 1990

Corporate Author:

CALIFORNIA UNIV IRVINE CENTER FOR THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF LEARNING AND MEMORY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-12-05

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

Studies were conducted on the induction, expression, and stabilization of long-term potentiation LTP, a form of synaptic plasticity that is likely to participate in memory encoding. Induction was shown to involve a glycine receptor site that modulates calcium fluxes through a subclass of transmitter receptors. Other results indicated that LTP expression is not likely to involve release or changes in spine increased resistance, but did provide direct evidence that potentiation reflects a change in the conductance properties of post-synaptic receptors. The hypothesis was developed that stabilization of LTP involves a disconnection and reconnection of adhesive relationships that maintain the organization of the synaptic region. This involves a calcium sensitive protease that cleaves cytoskeletal proteins and the exposure of a group of adhesion receptors known as integrins. Together with results form previous years of support, and from other laboratories, work over the past year has led to a reasonable complete hypothesis concerning how synapses can be rapidly transformed from one stable state to another and thus be used as memory storage devices.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE