Accession Number:

ADA227343

Title:

The Aerial Dogfight: a Valid Part of Today's and Tomorrow's Air War

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis Aug 1989-Jun 1990

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

158.0

Abstract:

This study explores the evolution of technology and the aerial dogfight. It looks at how technology has tried unsuccessfully to eliminate the need for aircraft to engage in close-in aerial combat know as aerial dogfights, to achieve air superiority or defend themselves and survive from hostile aircraft. The study looks at four different conflicts the United States in Vietnam, the Israelis in both the Yom Kippur War and Operation Peace for Galilee, and the British in the Falklands War. Four factors are examined which vary in prominence in each of these conflicts financial restrictions, limitations of technology, rules of engagement, and the fog of war. The study concludes that technology in the foreseeable future will not be able to totally eliminate the aerial dogfight in a major conflict. As technology improves the effectiveness of weapons, it also improves the counters to these weapons. Financial restrictions in the form of budget constraints during times of peace have been a limiting factor to a countrys technological advances prior to a conflict, and directly influence how a country will be able to fight at the start of any conflict. Rules of engagement and the fog of war further limit technology from being employed in its optimum designed application during a conflict.

Subject Categories:

  • Attack and Fighter Aircraft
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE