Accession Number:

ADA224044

Title:

South Africa: Minerals, Sanctions and Foreign Policy

Descriptive Note:

Individual study project,

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-05-30

Pagination or Media Count:

141.0

Abstract:

The United States is dependent on the Republic of South Africa for a variety of minerals. From the defense standpoint, the National Defense Stockpile in conjunction with identified emergency actions would permit the United States to prosecute a war for the anticipated three year emergency period. Disruption of minerals, short of a national emergency, would adversely effect American industry, but would not precipitate the forecast disaster unless the disruption singularly effected the United States. The only feasible scenario that would produce a unilateral disruption of South African minerals is a complete embargo imposed by Congress. Sanctions are given the majority of credit for the policy changes of the South African Government. However, the changes resulted from a combination of economic difficulties, independent of sanctions natural disaster and, most importantly, continued black defiance. Sanctions were a contributor. Hopes for a peaceful transition to a non-racial system in South Africa hinge on two extraordinary men Nelson Mandela and Frederik W. de Klerk. In that regard the United States can do three things to aid the negotiations process. First, we must enhance and reinforce the preeminent positions of de Klerk and Mandela. Second, we should review current sanctions and devise a system to reward South Africa for each positive step. And finally, the United States should commit funds to support black education, land ownership and economic development. kr

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE