Accession Number:

ADA222017

Title:

Surface Warfare Attrition: Does Ship Type Make a Difference?

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1989-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

141.0

Abstract:

This thesis seeks to determine if there is a relationship between ship type and first-term enlisted attrition in the Surface Warfare Navy. The data used were taken from the DOD Enlisted Master Record EMR. Information on male sailors aboard ships with 33 months or less of completed service was extracted from the EMR. The three cohorts examined were those who joined their first ship in fiscal 1977, 1981, and 1985. A total of 77,502 personnel serving in 300 ships were analyzed in three data formats individual ship, ship class and ship mission category. The results revealed wide variation in attrition rates between individual ships and respective ship classes across different cohorts. In addition, a distinct trend in attrition was observed between ships in different mission categories. For example, oilers generally had the highest rate of attrition across all three cohorts -- followed in order by amphibious ships, minesweepers, and repair ships with cruisers, destroyers, and frigates having the lowest rate. Further research is recommended to determine the causes for differences in attrition between ship types. Understanding this aspect of enlisted personnel attrition may further aid Navy manpower and leaders in reducing personnel attrition and its consequences for the Surface. Keywords Warfare Navy Naval personnel Retention Naval support vessels Naval combatant vessels Naval surface warfare Ship personnel.

Subject Categories:

  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE