Accession Number:

ADA220709

Title:

The Human Factor in the Soviet Armed Forces: Leadership, Cohesion and Effectiveness

Descriptive Note:

Study project,

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-02-15

Pagination or Media Count:

49.0

Abstract:

Strategy is based in part on assessment of the threat. We tend to emphasize objective indicators of capability in making our assessment of threats, in part because these are more tangible and are often even quantifiable. Subjective factors such as the threats strategic culture and the willingness and ability of soldiers to fight under the stress of combat are often underestimated, if not omitted entirely from considerations of the threat. This study is an evaluation of the potential combat effectiveness of the Soviet armed forces based upon evaluation of variables that affect the human dimension of combat. Cohesion, leadership and stress training are the variables that are considered. The Soviets use an approach to combat motivation that is not based on cohesion but rather on ideology. Small-unit leadership is weak among both officers and NCOs. Stress training is no adaptive with respect to modern high- intensity combat. The important determinants of cohesion and leadership are weakened by systemic factors that make change difficult and unlikely for the foreseeable future. The human factor is a significant weakness in the Soviet military and should be taken into account in assessing the threat that the USSR represents today and tomorrow. SDW

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics
  • Human Factors Engineering and Man Machine Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE